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Area: 26,000 Acres
Lat: 36.490566
Lon: 121.182492
Nearby Services
Gas-Tres Pinos, Hollister, K, 26, 32, 32 MilesFood-Tres Pinos, Hollister, K, 26, 32, 32 MilesLodging-Hollister, King City, 32, 32 Miles
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Brochure/Species List Bus Accessible Camping/lodging
Drinking Water Fee Food/Vending Machines
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Restrooms Trails Trash Cans
Visitor Center/Ranger Station

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Every Kid in a Park. Initiative that gives every U.S. 4th grader and his or her family free access to 2000+ federally managed lands and waters. Educators can also participate.
Pinnacles National Park - Site # 164
Rugged volcanic spires and crags form a dramatic background for a diverse habitat that is host to California condors, birds of prey, snakes & reptiles, wildflowers and lady beetles
PremiumPremium - the most significant sites, worth visiting if you have limited time. Premium sites have high wildlife values year-round, staff on site, interpretive programs and/or displays, and well-developed facilities.

Background: Rugged volcanic spires and crags cloaked by chaparrral and gray pines rise abrubtly from oak-studded hills. This pristine area sustains a dozen lizard species and half as many snakes, including coast horned lizards, western whiptails, California king snakes, and gopher snakes. In late summer and fall, watch roads and trails for legions of slow-moving tarantulas on the move to find a mate. Oak woodlands and riparian corridors shelter black-tailed deer and gray foxes. Spring brings abundant wildflowers and millions of swarming lady bird beetles. Prairie falcons and American kestrels hunt from rocky perches on the Balconies Cliffs. Dozens of turkey vultures roost in trees near visitor center, flying off in dramatic morning and evening departures. California thrashers, black-headed grosbeaks, and Nuttall's woodpeckers are common. Moreover, California condors are reestablishing themselves among the rocky peaks and ridges and can often be seen soaring above.

Wildlife and Where to Find It: Car, trails, overlooks, visitor center. Trails vary in length and difficulty.

Viewing Tips: Look for birds of prey from January to July. Songbirds are seen year-round, best viewing in spring. There is a high probability of seeing reptiles, deer, and gray foxes year-round. More than 600 plants. Watch for tule elk and pronghorn south of monument on Highway 25. Tarantulas, deer, feral pigs, and cattle on east side road in fall. Please note that State Highway 146 accesses the monument from both east and west sides, but is not continuous through the monument.

Festivals & Events: Local schools visit monument for field trips. Local native Americans collect grasses for basket-weaving.
Salinas Valley Fair, San Benito County Fair

Visitor Information: San Benito County Chamber of Commerce - 831-637-5315 - www.sanbenitocountychamber.com
Viewing Site Hours of Operation are:
Staff On-site: Yes
Open: Sun,Mon,Tues,Wed,Thur,Fri,Sat
Hours: 24 hours
Year Round: Yes

Road Information:   Paved. 
Road Hazards: 
 Number of Parking Spaces: 0
Parking Fee: No
Proximity to viewing area:
 Pull-Through Parking: Yes
Parking Notes: 

How to Get There: To east side visitor center, from Gilroy on Highway 101, take Highway 25 south 42 miles to Highway 146, turn right, and drive 5 miles to visitor center. To west side, at Soledad on Highway 101, take Highway 146 east 12 miles to end of road.
 

Contact Information
Managing Agency: National Park Service
Agency Site URL: http://www.nps.gov/pinn
Physical Address:5000 State Highway 146
Paicines, CA 95043
Agency 2:5000 State Highway 146
Paicines, CA 95043
Manager Phone:831-389-4486 Contact Us:by Email
Site Phone:831-389-4486
County: San Benito
Addition Website: