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Visitation: 175,000
Area: 910 Acres
Lat: 41.011147
Lon: 121.649154
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Every Kid in a Park. Initiative that gives every U.S. 4th grader and his or her family free access to 2000+ federally managed lands and waters. Educators can also participate.
McArthur Burney Falls State Park - Site # 132
In a landscape of forests and lava flows, streams wind through lush riparian corridors, cascade down spectacular Burney Falls, then rush into Lake Britton.
RegionalRegional - worth visiting if you are already in the area. They may be located farther from populated areas or with more limited wildlife species.

Background: Black swifts and swallows nest behind and near the 129-foot falls. The canyon below shelters belted kingfishers, squirrels, skunks and many songbirds. Double-crested cormorants, pied-billed grebes and bald eagles fish the open lake. Great blue herons, mallards, and ruddy ducks feed near the oak-lined shore. Watch for owls, woodpeckers, and other species in the open, park-like forests.
The Atsugewi (Hat Creek Indians) and Achumawi (Pit River Indians) Native American tribes lived in the area for at least 7,000 years. The park is within the Lake Britton Archaeological District that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 14, 1975 to recognize the abundance of Native American village sites in the area.
Pioneer Cemetery was used from the 1870's till the 1920's by the local farming community.
From 1934 through 1937 the CCC installed campsites with mortared lava rock stoves, constructed roadways and parking sites, furnished the park with water service and toilets and built trails for hiking. A log cabin now acts as the park's visitor center.
Heritage Day takes place on the Sunday of Columbus Day weekend, and features demonstrations and recreations of typical activities and crafts of the late 1800's.

The Habitat: The park consists of a mix of coniferous and mixed hardwood forest. The main conifer species is ponderosa pine which is home to various woodpeckers and bald eagles. The predominant hardwood is the California black oak with some Oregon white oak which is great habitat for coyotes, gray foxes and porcupines. Montane chaparral, wet meadow and riparian habitats complete the mosaic which is McArthur-Burney Falls State Park.

The Experience: Declared a National Natural Landmark in December 1984. Along the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway. The Pacific Coast Trail.

Wildlife and Where to Find It: Wildlife can be viewed by car, boats, or on foot. 8-10 miles of hiking trails and roads. Trails are easy to moderate in difficulty.

Viewing Tips: Over 130 bird species have been observed in the park. Waterfowl watching is good fall through spring. Look for swifts and swallows nesting behind the falls in summer. Bald eagles, osprey, Cooper's hawks, and American peregrine falcons are just a few species that nest here. Small mammals are seen spring through fall. Patient, quiet bird watchers have best success. Rocky Mountain elk, black bear and mountain lions are occasionaly seen roaming through the park.

Site Notes: President Theodore Roosevelt once called Burney Falls the eighth wonder of the world. This spectacular cascading waterfall is not the highest nor largest waterfall in the state, but many people consider it the most beautiful. Unlike other waterfalls in this area or elsewhere, Burney Falls continues to flow at the same rate all year long - about 100 million gallons daily. The strikingly clear, pure water flows from openings in the volcanic rock at and above the falls. The 129-foot-high waterfall cascades into an almost iridescent pool underneath. Light penetrates deep into the clear water, reflecting a cool blue color.
The entire park and the uncrowded countryside around it are filled with natural and historic features that are apt to make your visit memorable. The park is located in the beautiful evergreen forests of the Pit River country in northeastern California. Fast-running streams of pure, cold water make for great fishing, and the recently-formed volcanic landscape is full of wonders.

Nearby Viewing Sites:  Ahjumawi Lava Springs State Park.
Baum Lake

Festivals & Events: Heritage Day: A celebration of pioneer spirit and

Visitor Information: Burney Chamber of Commerce - (530) 335-2111 - http://www.burneychamber.com/
Viewing Site Hours of Operation are:
Staff On-site: Yes
Open: Sun,Mon,Tues,Wed,Thur,Fri,Sat
Hours: Sunrise to Sunset
Year Round: Yes

Road Information:   Paved.  Gravel. 
Road Hazards: Snow / ice during winter.

Note 3. Public Safety. Swift moving water and cliffs-Stay on established trails. Visiting California State Parks and viewing wildlife is an experience in the natural world with the same inherent risks as other outdoor adventures. Changing weather conditions, rugged terrain with changing trail and road conditions, and hazards of surf and other waters, plants (poison oak, falling limbs, etc.) and animals (mountain lions, rattlesnakes, ticks, etc.) are a part of life outdoors, as is protecting yourself and your belongings. Use the Visit a Park link at the State Park web page for precautions and public safety information.
 Number of Parking Spaces: 221
Parking Fee: Yes
Proximity to viewing area:varied
 Pull-Through Parking: No
Parking Notes: Narrow campground roads. Parking fee subject to change. See park website.

Note 3. Public Safety. Swift moving water and cliffs-Stay on established trails. Visiting California State Parks and viewing wildlife is an experience in the natural world with the same inherent risks as other outdoor adventures. Changing weather conditions, rugged terrain with changing trail and road conditions, and hazards of surf and other waters, plants (poison oak, falling limbs, etc.) and animals (mountain lions, rattlesnakes, ticks, etc.) are a part of life outdoors, as is protecting yourself and your belongings. Use the Visit a Park link at the State Park web page for precautions and public safety information.

How to Get There: From Redding, take Highway 299 east 6 miles past Burney to juntion with Highway 89. Drive north on Highway 89, 6 miles to entrance
 

Contact Information
Managing Agency: California State Parks
Agency Site URL: http://www.parks.ca.gov/default.asp?page_id=455
Physical Address:24898 Hwy 89
Burney, CA 96013
Agency 2:24898 Hwy 89
Burney, CA 96013
Manager Phone:(530) 335-2777
Site Phone:(530) 335-2777
County: Shasta
Addition Website: